Magazine

Browse Issues

Browse by Year

August 2002 (Vol. 71, No. 12) $3.25

  • The Bawl Mill

    • What budget deficit?
    • Congressional underdog...
    • More than just 12 angry men...
  • Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife Raises Harassment of Miners to a New Level

    New regulations have given the enforcement arm of the WDFW official “police” status, with the authority to issue citations, pursue warrants, make arrests and confiscate items.
  • Legislative and Regulatory Update

    • Endangered Species Act reform
    • Extremist groups blamed for catastrophic wildfires
    • EPA revisists TMDL
    • National Heritage Act seeks to take control of lands away from local government
  • Oregon Miners File Suit Against Fisheries Service

    Eastern Oregon Mining Association members have filed a federal lawsuit against the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) demanding that the agency provide biological opinions on any threat to wildlife or the environment so miners can begin working their claims.
  • BLM Land Swap Deal Raises Eyebrows

    The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Washington D.C. is reviewing a land swap with a private company because the bureau allowed an employee of the company to arrange the deal.
  • Gold in Nevada

    Over 135 million ounces of gold were produced in Nevada between 1858 and 2001, 107 million of that total being since 1965. Now, the so-called “Silver State” is the leading gold producer in the nation.
  • The Greenhorn

    I wanted to become part of the romance of Colorado—to become part of the romance of mining in those majestic mountains. The path ahead of me was much rougher than I anticipated.
  • Striking Gold

    There’s a lot of luck involved when it comes to finding gold. Sometimes it’s being in the right place at the right time. Other times it’s simply by accident that discoveries are made.
  • The Bombarded 38' Parallel

    A 1,200-mile long east-west zone, containing unusual geologic features, has been recognized in the eastern half of the United States for over 100 years. It coincides, in a general way, with the 38° parallel. There are as many opinions on the origin of the features as there are geologists. Most of the features are circular or oval in form, and some are concealed by younger rocks. They are found in 8 states, from Kansas east to Virginia.
  • Picks & Pans: The Trophy Hunt

    Out of the frying pan and into the fridge! I just returned from the trip of a lifetime—Ganes Creek, Alaska. It all started back in November of last year when Steve Herschbach announced the Clark/Weize Mining Company was going to offer up...
  • Corner Country Gold

    In 1845, the intrepid Australian explorer Captain Charles Sturt set out from Adelaide, the capital of the Colony of South Australia, to search for a supposed inland sea in the center of the continent. Travelling northeast through South Australia into the northwest corner of the Colony of New South Wales, he and his party of 15 men found themselves in the midst of a fierce drought.
  • Something to Consider When You Go Dredging

    I have been a gold dredger for 9 years. The first dredge I bought was a 4-inch, with a 5hp engine. It had 15 feet of suction hose, a beat up regulator, a patched air reservoir, and floats that were sun baked and cracked—what a beauty. Vaughn and Darrel sold me this dredge, and could tell that this crazy “Canuck” was excited. We talked for many hours that first day I met them, and I was eager to learn...
  • Western Mining Artifact Collectors Show

    A year of work and preparation has come and gone as the Western Mining Artifact Show was held this past June 29th at the Miners Foundry in Nevada City, California. It was three days of fun and adventure delighting in the glory of the golden days of California gold mining of long ago.
  • Rattlesnakes

    Every miner has encountered rattlesnakes in his work, and some may have been bitten. The writer has never been bitten, but has worked with people who have been. It is not a pleasant experience.
  • The Gold Hill and Iowa Mine 1895-1938

    Mining was curtailed at the Gold Hill Mine in Quartsburg, Idaho, in September 1895, because the owners disagreed about the profitability of pumping large volumes of water from the workings and mining the sulfide ores encountered in the lower levels. In June 1896, the property was sold at auction to A. H. Boomer of San Francisco, California for $4,500. The following day Boomer deeded the mine to...
  • Looking Back

    Excerpts from California Mining Journal, our original title, published 50 years ago this month.
  • Melman on Gold & Silver

    Yet another term has entered the lexicon of investment analysis and that term is “Fallen Angels.” No, we are not referring to religious icons or celestial bodies. Rather, the investment community has dubbed the debt instruments of once-prosperous companies that have now fallen on hard times with that moniker.
  • Mining Stock Quotes and Mineral & Metal Prices

Want more? Get an online subscription to gain access to over 3,000 articles!

Advertisements

Garrett Electronics - trusted by real miners & prospectors!
Precious Metals Recovery plants and equipment
Fighting to keep public lands open to the public
Specializing in the processing of precious metal ores!
Watch prospecting shows on your computer right now
Free Online Sample Issue