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Prospectors & Attorneys

It is a fact that when most prospectors hear the word attorney they make the sign of the cross and run for cover. I understand all that, but there does come a time when we must face the facts. Sometimes we need them.

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Editorial: Montana's Controversial Rock Creek Mine


Throughout history, the demand for commodities has been constantly increasing. It is difficult to envision a reversal of this trend. Between China and India alone, roughly two billion people are on the verge of becoming middle class consumers. Good or bad, this is called progress, and it seems inevitable.

Working the Belmont Mine—1953 (Part 3—Conclusion)


Tuesday morning started off much like Monday except Jack wasn’t packing a bunch of drill bits. We wandered off toward the bottom of the raise, adjusted our bed boards, had a cup of coffee from our buckets, and smoked a cigarette. Then Jack stretched, stood up, and remarked, “Guess I might as well go up and see what it looks like. You wait here for now. When I call down, send up a section of ladder and eight laggings.”

Metal Detecting Old Hard Rock Mine Dumps


The type of mine dump that is best for metal detecting are the ones that consist of mixed sizes of rock and are located near some sort of excavation, commonly a shaft or adit. Sometimes the piles located along a trench dug by the miners can be productive as well.

Over The Divide—Chuck Cox, 1943-2009


We were saddened to learn that Chuck Cox, a long-time prospector and tireless organizer for the Washington Prospectors Mining Association, passed away...

Exploration, Development and Taxes


Further demonstrating the importance of seeking professional assistance and advice are the tax rules governing the expenses of a mining company. The tax treatment of mine exploration and mine development costs is confusing, complex and often overlooked or ignored—except by the ever-vigilant Internal Revenue Service.

The Lost Silver Triangle of the Sierra Madre—Conclusion: Tayopa, Guaynopa, and Guaynopita


Lieutenant Henry O. Flipper might well have been correct about the “Santa Fe de Rodríquez” being the name of what is now called Guaynopa. However, an Indian named Agustín de la Cruz, who was associated with Cristóbal Rodríquez, is credited with discovering the mine in 1741. It is probable that the Spanish settlement had indeed been found because of its rather extensive ruins.

Mining Camp Adventures—The Collinsville-Twin Creek Goldfields


Collinsville had been the scene of several small gold stampedes. The golden paystreaks had paid well here at times, with two main creeks producing most of the gold, including a 19 ounce nugget found on nearby Mills Creek, which flowed 100 yards away from the main camp.

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