Let us help you recover valuable metals. 888-437-1187

Magazine

All Articles

Interview With A Coho Salmon

We’ve obtained the rights to publish this exclusive interview conducted on the Klamath River between David, an environmental activist, and a Coho salmon.

David: “What do you think about these suction gold dredgers?”

Coho: “Suction gold dredgers?”

David: “They’re the miners who run those noisy machines, vacuuming the river bottoms in search of gold while destroying the rivers.”

Coho: “They make noise? Hmm, I hadn’t noticed. They’re never running when I come through. Does it bother you? It seems like you’re bothered by it. Have you tried going to a different area so you aren’t annoyed by the noise? Do you have a problem with sharing the river? Is that the issue? You know, I hear there’s counseling available for those humans who have problems with sharing.”

David: “I’m asking the questions here.”

Coho: “Sorry. I spend much of my life out in the ocean. I’m not really around when the dredges are operating, so the noise doesn’t bother me.”

David: “Don’t you swim up the rivers during spawning season and lay your eggs?”

Coho: “Yeah, but I’ve heard there are some rules or something the dredgers follow so they aren’t in the water during that time.”

David: “Well, what about these holes they make when they move the gravel and boulders? That must make you pretty angry!”

Coho: “Suction dredgers create the holes? I thought you guys did that, because those are a huge help. Some of the water is too warm for us. The deeper water in the hole is cooler, and it’s a great place to get out of the faster currents and rest. Holes are awesome.”

David: “Never mind. What about those gravel areas, where the compacted gravels are broken up and redistributed?”

Coho: “I’ve been meaning to thank you for that. We lose a few of our offspring if high water comes, but we still prefer those areas for spawning.”

David: “Ummm, let’s move on. Let’s talk about mercury. Mercury is in the gravels and these dredgers are stirring it up. Doesn’t that bother you?”

Coho: “Yeah that shiny, liquid metal is nasty stuff. It messes with my nervous system.”

David: “Now we’re making progress. So tell me how the dredgers are causing you severe harm by stirring up the mercury?”

Coho: “Yeah, I think you’re confused. I’m pretty sure when they vacuum the river bottom to get the gold they also capture almost all of the mercury. The tiny amount they don’t get ends up making its way back through the gravels and settles in the cracks of the bedrock. I heard that mercury is bad for humans, too! I’m sure you guys know this. Haven’t you read the studies?”

David: “No. I mean, yes. Well, we’ve produced our own studies.”

Coho: “Are these studies biased? Are the results predetermined?”

David: “Let’s get back to the questions. How about all that sediment they stir up? That must be a pain.”

Coho: “Have you ever been to a river during the winter run off? That’s some serious cloudy water, like thousands of times worse than what comes off a dredge. The dredge plumes are a joke in comparison. Next question.”

David: “Okay. Let’s talk about trash. You know, garbage. Doesn’t that stuff mess up your habitat?”

Coho: “Sure does. Those dredgers leave tons of lead with these stringy things attached.”

David: “Ummm, the lead is actually left by fishermen.”

Coho: “Oh. So, what is it you guys actually do to help us?”

David: “Well, we collect money, which we use to conduct studies, educate the public, and provide legislators with funds for their elections so they will support our position. We also file lawsuits against the state to stop any activity that might damage your environment.”

Interview with a Coho salmonCoho: “That’s cool. So you constantly harass the fishermen while supporting the dredgers? And the Indians too, of course—they use gill nets.”

David: “Ummm, no. We team up with fishermen and Indians and sue the dredgers.”

Coho: “I am soooo confused.”

David: “The fishermen, the Indian tribes, and other groups who want exclusive use of the rivers are the ones who give us money, so we’re all on the same team.”

Coho: “So, you team up with those who kill us to stop those who help us?? Even a fish can recognize a problem with your logic!”

David: “What would you recommend?”

Coho: “Why don’t you guys start suction dredging? That would be a huge help to us. You could totally clean up our habitat, get rid of that nasty mercury and those lead things, make some nice spawning beds and some of those awesome holes. You’d get some gold to help your family and the economy. I hear the economy is pretty messed up right now.”

David: “You want us to start dredging?”

Coho: “It would create a win-win situation for fish and humans! Oh, I forgot—the noise bothers you and you don’t like to share. I guess it’s much easier to mine the humans for contributions than it is to mine for gold. And it seems to me you should be suing the fishermen instead of the dredgers.”

David: “Just between you and me, the fishermen are the next target on our list, but we’re not done using them yet.”
© ICMJ's Prospecting and Mining Journal, CMJ Inc.
Next Article »« Previous Article

Add a Comment

Additional articles that might interest you...

The Birthday Nugget Patch


Down around 10 or 12 inches I hit a large cobble that appeared to be one type of hot rock for this area. I thought bad things about the new technology until I checked the rock.

Training Videos From NIOSH


Mining safety professionals can take advantage of training videos provided by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

The Bawl Mill


• The dog ate my homework
• Boating in Afghanistan?

The Small Hardrock Mill—Part I


Ore dressing is of prime importance to the operator of a small hardrock gold mine. No, Virginia, ore dressing has nothing to do with dressing in the latest spring dresses, or the stuff that gets forced into the turkey on Thanksgiving. It refers to the method of processing ore to extract the valuable minerals contained in the rock—in the case of this series of articles, gold and silver.

The Rush to Treasure Hill


There were some exceptional times in the far-flung history of the West. Rich finds of minerals that set men’s souls ablaze. From the rich gold fields of California, men who arrived too late to find riches went searching in every direction. The trail that we will follow leads east, past the shining silver district of the Comstock Lode.

Detecting for Gold in Australia—The Kimberley Trip


The hair stood up on the back of my neck when I saw this, especially the nice patches of wash in the bottoms of the gullies, a sure sign of an auriferous source being nearby.

Company Notes


• Barrick Gold Corp.
• Montana Resources
• Placer Dome
• Newmont Mining
• Norilsk Nickel
• AngloGold Ltd.
• Ashanti Goldfields Co. Ltd.
• Randgold Resources
• Ivanhoe Mines Ltd.

Subscription Required:
The Bawl Mill   • Legislative and Regulatory Update   • Drive Under Way to Restore the Rights of Suction Dredgers   • Abbey Confirmed As BLM Director   • Gifts of Gold for University of Zimbabwe   • Flood Stage—The Key to Reading a River   • Noted Geologist Murdered in Kenya   • South Yuba River Recreational Area   • Rio Employees Face Trade Secrets, Bribery Charges   • Pocket Mining Potential in Nevada's East Humboldt Range   • Company Finds Gold in Wyoming’s Rattlesnake Hills   • The Economic Impact of Suction Dredging in California   • Bucket Line Dredges   • Melman on Gold & Silver   • Mining Stock Quotes and Mineral & Metal Prices

Free:

Advertisements

Garrett Electronics - trusted by real miners & prospectors!
Precious Metals Recovery plants and equipment
Fighting to keep public lands open to the public
Specializing in the processing of precious metal ores!
Watch prospecting shows on your computer right now
Free Online Sample Issue