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Articles by Associated Press
New Mining Regulations in Maine

Renewed interest in mining of gold, silver, copper and other metals in Aroostook County's Bald Mountain triggered 2012 legislation requiring the overhaul of the state's two-decade-old mining regulations.

February 2014 (Vol. 83, No. 6)
Comstock Mining Gets Approval

The approval, which affects 87 acres on the south end of Silver City, allows the company to move forward with exploration to determine the area's mining potential.

February 2014 (Vol. 83, No. 6)
Alaska: Large-Scale Mining Can Be Done Right

"As elected leaders of the State of Alaska, we want you to know that Alaska is open to investment from those who seek to develop our state's natural resources safely and responsibly..."

March 2014 (Vol. 83, No. 7)
Government Takes Land for Open Space

Rather than using the practice of government seizure of private property to promote economic development, the county is using it to preserve open space.

March 2014 (Vol. 83, No. 7)
Hidden Value in Old Tailings

The 15 rare earth elements were discovered long after the gold rush began to wane, but demand for them only took off over the past 10 years...

March 2014 (Vol. 83, No. 7)
Gold Pour Signals Revival in the Mother Lode

Miners are digging again where their forebears once unearthed riches from eight historic mines that honeycomb Sutter Gold Mining Company’s holdings about 50 miles southeast of Sacramento.

January 2013 (Vol. 82, No. 5)
Feds Challenge North Idaho Mining Claims

Fishing, camping and the protection of American Indian artifacts along a 30-mile section of the North Fork of the Clearwater River outweigh the desire of placer miners to search for gold, an attorney representing the US Forest Service said.

February 2013 (Vol. 82. No. 6)
$50 Million Swiped in Diamond Heist

Eight masked gunmen forced their way through the security fence at Brussels’ international airport, drove onto the tarmac and snatched some $50 million worth of diamonds from the hold of a Swiss-bound plane without firing a shot.

March 2013 (Vol. 82, No. 7)
Nevada Mining Tax Cap Repeal Clears Committee

An Assembly panel approved a measure to repeal the constitutional tax cap on net proceeds paid by mining companies in Nevada.

June 2013 (Vol. 82, No. 10)
Record $11 Million Fine for California Mine

State regulators imposed a record $11 million fine on the operators of a gold mine in the Sierra foothills east of Sacramento.

July 2013 (Vol. 82, No. 11)
12-Year-Old Unearths Large Diamond

It is the eighth largest brown diamond to be found and certified by park staff.

September 2013 (Vol. 83, No. 1)
Carissa Gold Mine Comes Back to Life

The mine will be open for public tours Saturday and Sunday afternoons beginning August 24, lasting into the fall and winter as weather permits.

September 2013 (Vol. 83, No. 1)
Cripple Creek Gold Mine Exceeding Expectations

At the peak of construction later this year, the mine will generate more than 6,000 direct and indirect jobs across the state with annual wages totaling more than $200 million...

September 2013 (Vol. 83, No. 1)
Partner Withdraws from Pebble Project

One of the partners in a massive and contentious proposed gold and copper mine in Alaska is pulling out, raising questions about the future of the project.

October 2013 (Vol. 83, No. 2)
A Gold Mine on a Washington Beach?

Bela and Barbara Kovacs began prospecting for gold about seven years ago as a family orientated outdoors activity. A welder by trade and lured by the simple fact that beach sands can contain small bits of precious metals, Bela decided a few years ago to build a sand sucking contraption that can sift the shoreline for anything worth keeping.

February 2012 (Vol. 81, No. 6)
Judge Tosses Lawsuit Against Tucson-Area Mine

A federal judge has tossed a lawsuit filed by opponents of a Tucson-area mine that had accused the US Forest Service of violating two federal laws in its handling of the mine issue.

March 2012 (Vol. 81, No. 7)
US Policies Holding Back Arizona

Washington’s decision to bar new uranium mining near the Grand Canyon and other federal policies on energy and resource issues are barriers holding back Arizona and its residents from prosperity, Governor Jan Brewer told a congressional hearing March 16.

April 2012 (Vol. 81, No. 8)
Pursuing Rare Earths in Wyoming

The company that wants to build and operate the mine, Rare Element Resources Ltd., promises high-wage jobs and economic vitality to an area where 40 percent of the population is age 50 or older.

June 2012 (Vol. 81, No. 10)
Colorado Mining Association Appeals Roadless Ruling

The Colorado Mining Association is asking the US Supreme Court to review a 2001 rule that largely barred new roads on 58 million acres of roadless areas in national forests.

June 2012 (Vol. 81, No. 10)
New Silver and Zinc Mine Slated for Montana

Arizona-based International Silver Inc. is proposing an underground silver and zinc mine in Montana and has asked Butte-Silver Bow County to lease them the surface and mineral rights to hundreds of acres.

September 2012 (Vol. 82, No. 1)
Eastern Oregon Mine Seeks Permits

After a host of companies spent 20 years prospecting, a mining firm is ready to make a play on the $2 billion lode of gold sitting in Eastern Oregon.

September 2012 (Vol. 82, No. 1)
Mining Returns to Historic Comstock

Mining has returned to Nevada’s historic Comstock more than 150 years after the discovery of one of the world’s richest silver veins touched off a frenzy that drew thousands of people west. But unlike the hard rock miners in the 1800s, the modern day operation involves huge trucks...

September 2012 (Vol. 82, No. 1)
BLM Issues Environmental Review of Wyoming Uranium Mine

If all goes well before the BLM issues its final approval, Littleton, Colorado-based UR-Energy could start building the Lost Creek mine by early October, according to company and BLM officials.

September 2012 (Vol. 82, No. 1)
Recluse Died with $7 Million in Gold

A Carson City recluse whose body was found in his home at least a month after he died left only $200 in his bank account.

October 2012 (Vol. 82, No. 2)
Four Arrested for California Mining Museum Heist

Four men believed to be responsible for a September heist of about $1.3 million in precious gems and gold from a mining museum in the Sierra Nevada foothills have been arrested, the California Highway Patrol (CHP) said.

December 2012 (Vol. 82, No. 4)
Silver Boom Prompts Idaho Mine Expansion

The Lucky Friday is already one of North America’s deepest hard-rock mines. Now, the 62-year-old mine is about to get much deeper.

January 2011 (Vol. 80, No. 5)
Silver Mining Returning to Texas

Today, a Canadian company is reviving the mine to take advantage of silver prices that have tripled since 2009, giving the few dozen residents still living in the area more action than they’ve seen in decades.

April 2011 (Vol. 80, No. 8)
Dredge Mining—Current Situation in Idaho

Tomten concedes the scenario of federal environmental agents swooping in on river dredges near historic mining towns like Idaho City, Rocky Bar or Placerville remains unlikely.

June 2011 (Vol. 80, No. 10)
Nevada Gold Value Up Along With Production

Nevada gold mines produced only about 6 percent more gold in 2010 than they did the year before, but the value of that gold was up a whopping 33 percent.

July 2011 (Vol. 80, No. 11)
Jury: Gov't Rightfully Seized 1933 Gold Coins

The verdict capped an unusual civil case that combined history, coin collecting and whether the $20 “double eagles” ever legally left the US Mint.

August 2011 (Vol. 80, No. 12)
Managers at Fault for Two Deaths at Meikle Mine

Two miners were killed in an accident partly because someone wedged a broom handle against a reset button to bypass an alarm that would have shut down the system, federal safety investigators said.

December 2011 (Vol. 81, No. 4)
Liberal Group Begins Push to Tax Mining in Nevada

A Nevada liberal advocacy group is mounting a drive to get voters to back a ballot measure to collect more taxes from gold mining.

January 2010 (Vol. 79, No. 5)
Mining Reform and Congress

After years of negotiations between environmentalists and industry groups, observers say efforts to reform the 1872 Mining Law may finally pick up steam in Congress.

February 2010 (Vol. 79, No. 6)
Michigan Approves Nickel, Copper Mine

Regulators gave final approval to a nickel and copper mine for the Upper Peninsula.

February 2010 (Vol. 79, No. 6)
Utah Proposes Using Eminent Domain Against Federal Government

Conservative Utah lawmakers want to spark a US Supreme Court case that could ultimately allow states to develop resource-rich parcels of land that are now off limits where the federal government is the landlord.

March 2010 (Vol. 79, No. 7)
Mining Trade Group Sues Nevada Over Tax Initiative

The Nevada Mining Association has filed a lawsuit to block a petition asking state voters to raise taxes on mining.

March 2010 (Vol. 79, No. 7)
China Will Put Rio Tinto Employees on Trial

The Australian government confirmed it was notified that a Shanghai court will try the four Rio employees including an Australian national.

March 2010 (Vol. 79, No. 7)
Investors Take a Shine to Platinum, Palladium

Move over gold and make way for platinum and palladium. Investors are taking a shine to these lesser-known precious metals as their prices rise.

May 2010 (Vol. 79, No. 9)
Nevada Mining Tax Fails in Signature Drive

Backers of the petition drive that began five months ago said they secured only about two-thirds of the 97,000 signatures they needed by the deadline to place the measure on the November ballot.

July 2010 (Vol. 79, No. 11)
Authorities Search for Lost Treasure Hunters

Rescue workers were searching a rugged Arizona wilderness area in triple-digit temperatures for three Utah men who went missing on July 11, while looking for the legendary Lost Dutchman Gold Mine.

August 2010 (Vol. 79, No. 12)
Alaska Geologist Survives Grizzly Attack

“When he stepped into the clearing he didn’t snarl and stand up and show me how big he was. He just came for me,” Miller said.

August 2010 (Vol. 79, No. 12)
Search Called Off for Missing Treasure Hunters

Treasure hunters have been looking for the Lost Dutchman mine for more than a century.

September 2010 (Vol. 80, No. 1)
Stillwater At Half Speed

Stillwater Mining Company’s East Boulder platinum and palladium mine is back in operation, with its staff cut in half...

January 2009 (Vol. 78, No. 5)
Elko County Has Highest State Median Income

New statistics released by the US Census Bureau show Elko County has the highest median family income in Nevada, thanks to the mining industry.

January 2009 (Vol. 78, No. 5)
Pebble Deposit Reveals Mineral Potential

The vast potential of the Pebble deposit is becoming more clear each day.

January 2009 (Vol. 78, No. 5)
Technology Opens Promise, Perils of Ocean Mining

There’s gold in that thar sea floor. Silver, copper, zinc and lead, too. The problem is, it’s a mile or two underwater and encased in massive mineral deposits that layer a dark, mysterious world.

May 2009 (Vol. 78, No. 9)
Gold Pours Again at Jerritt Mine

Yukon-Nevada received permission last month from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection to restart the mill, after the agency determined the company met environmental standards.

May 2009 (Vol. 78, No. 9)
NASCAR Driver Turns Prospector

When he’s not searching for improvements on the track, the affable driver is prospecting for gold across the United States.

June 2009 (Vol. 78, No. 10)
Chinese Buy Out Australian Miners

Some Australian lawmakers object to allowing Chinese government companies to buy mining assets that they say are a cornerstone of Australia’s economy.

July 2009 (Vol. 78, No. 11)
Germany Developing Gold Vending Machine

It’s a novel twist on the vending machine: in go the coins, out comes a nugget of gold.

July 2009 (Vol. 78, No. 11)
GM to Cancel Mining Contracts

Governor Brian Schweitzer is calling on the Obama administration to force General Motors to honor its contract with a Montana mining company instead of going overseas to buy the precious metals used to control vehicle pollution.

August 2009 (Vol. 78, No. 12)
Newmont Fined for Fatality

The agency said managers “showed a disregard for the miners’ welfare” and acted with “more than ordinary negligence” before the victim fell through a sinkhole while operating a large loader about 200 feet below the entrance of the mine.

August 2009 (Vol. 78, No. 12)
Rio Tinto: Allegations Without Foundation

Bribery allegations against four Rio Tinto employees detained in China are “wholly without foundation,” the mining company said, as Australia continued to press Beijing for details of a case that is straining ties between the two nations.

August 2009 (Vol. 78, No. 12)
Abbey Confirmed As BLM Director

Bob Abbey, former state director of the Bureau of Land Management in Nevada, was confirmed as national director of the agency.

September 2009 (Vol. 79, No. 1)
Noted Geologist Murdered in Kenya

Assailants armed with arrows, spears and machetes killed a Scottish-born geologist in an apparent dispute over mining rights in southeast Kenya.

September 2009 (Vol. 79, No. 1)
Rio Employees Face Trade Secrets, Bribery Charges

China has formally arrested four employees of Anglo-Australian mining giant Rio Tinto Ltd. on charges of infringing trade secrets and bribery...

September 2009 (Vol. 79, No. 1)
Company Finds Gold in Wyoming’s Rattlesnake Hills

Wayne Sutherland, a metals, gemstones and economic geology specialist with the Wyoming State Geological Survey, said the initial exploration samples were significant.

September 2009 (Vol. 79, No. 1)
Possible Discovery Sparks New Klondike Gold Rush

...this time, instead of swarming over streams and gravel beds teasing out flakes of the precious metal, miners may have found the fabled and elusive mother lode.

October 2009 (Vol. 79, No. 2)
Oregon Governor Asks For Mineral Withdrawal

Conservation groups hope to meld the three wilderness areas and surrounding parts of southwestern Oregon into one big wilderness covering 1 million acres—a move Kulongoski has endorsed.

November 2009 (Vol 79, No. 3)
Michigan Proposal Would Restrict Mining Operations

A group called Michigan Save Our Water Committee is seeking a Michigan ballot measure that would prohibit some types of mining and restrict others.

November 2009 (Vol 79, No. 3)
Nevada Regulators Reach Agreement With Queenstake Resources

Environmental regulators ordered Jerritt Canyon Mine near the Nevada-Idaho line closed on May 30 for failure to install equipment to control mercury air emissions. Yukon-Nevada blamed the failure on needed parts that didn’t arrive in time.

November 2009 (Vol 79, No. 3)
Stillwater Recovers Without GM’s Business

Stillwater Mining Company previously warned of possible layoffs after General Motors Co. canceled a major contract, but higher platinum and palladium prices have made up for the lost business.

November 2009 (Vol 79, No. 3)
Gold Has Shown Its Mettle, But How High Can It Go?

How high can gold go? How best to hold it? Questions on gold investment answered.

November 2009 (Vol 79, No. 3)
Utility Agrees to Remove Four Klamath River Dams

PacificCorp, which owns four hydroelectric dams on the Klamath River, has agreed to terms for their removal, a key milestone in efforts to restore what was once the third biggest salmon run on the West Coast and end decades of battles over scarce water.

November 2009 (Vol 79, No. 3)
Judge Rules Against Oregon Miner

A federal judge convicted Oregon miner Clifford Tracy of illegal mining while digging for gold on US Forest Service land.

December 2009 (Vol. 79, No. 4)
Mining Restrictions Lifted in Southwest Alaska

Mining restrictions will be lifted on about 1 million acres of federal land in southwest Alaska, officials have announced.

January 2008 (Vol.77, No. 5)
Turning Waste Rock Into Profit

When others saw piles of waste rock at the former LTV Steel Mining property, Brad Gerlach saw opportunity.

February 2008 (Vol. 77, No. 6)
Golden Sunlight Seeks Expansion

The Golden Sunlight Mine in Whitehall wants to expand its open pit operations, possibly extending the life of the mine by five years.

February 2008 (Vol. 77, No. 6)
Government to Buy New World Mine Claims

A conservation group said it has an agreement to purchase nearly 1,500 acres of private mining claims northeast of Yellowstone National Park.

April 2008 (Vol. 77, No. 8)
Legislation Would Require Palladium Coin

Pending legislation requiring the government to mint a $20 coin with palladium mined domestically would put Montana front and center.

June 2008 (Vol. 77, No. 10)
Record Gold Prices Prompt Gold Mining In Boulder

Nearly 150 years after gold was discovered in Boulder County along Gold Run Creek, a couple of old mines are slowly cranking back into operation now that excavating the slender veins of precious metal is profitable again.

June 2008 (Vol. 77, No. 10)
Miners Go To Work In Washington

Nearly two decades after it was first proposed, a mine on Buckhorn Mountain in remote north-central Washington will begin producing gold-bearing ore.

July 2008 (Vol. 77, No. 11)
Whitehall Mine Foregoing Closure

Strong gold prices are making it profitable to keep the Golden Sunlight Mine here open through 2015, company officials said.

July 2008 (Vol. 77, No. 11)
Work Begins At Rock Creek Mine

Work has begun on several buildings at the site of a proposed copper and silver mine that if approved would tunnel beneath Montana’s Cabinet Mountains Wilderness.

July 2008 (Vol. 77, No. 11)
Major Miners Go on Buying Spree

 A little more than two years ago, the co-founders of a small Canadian mining company unearthed a gold and silver deposit in southeastern Ecuador that industry experts believe is the most significant discovery in at least a decade.

September 2008 (Vol. 78, No. 1)
Winnemucca Rising While Other Towns Falter

Winnemucca has something almost every other place in Nevada wishes it had: jobs and relative prosperity.

September 2008 (Vol. 78, No. 1)
Newmont Steps Up For Laid Off Workers

Newmont Mining Corp. covered the final uncashed paychecks of workers who were laid off in August from the Jerritt Canyon Mine by another mining outfit.

October 2008 (Vol. 78, No. 2)
Gold Trader, Employee Charged with Wife’s Killing

A wealthy gold trader was charged with paying one of his workers to arrange the stabbing death of the businessman’s estranged wife...

October 2008 (Vol. 78, No. 2)
Wyoming Governor Pushes for Uranium Study Release

With energy companies clamoring to produce more uranium, Wyoming Governor Dave Freudenthal is urging federal regulators not to delay release of an environmental study on in-situ mining.

October 2008 (Vol. 78, No. 2)
Miners Find Encouraging Prospects Near Livengood

New exploration on land that was scoured for gold years ago near Livengood indicates the property could be developed into a mine on a scale similar to the Fort Knox Mine, according to a Colorado-based company.

November 2008 (Vol. 78, No. 3)
Mining Tax Increase Suggested

Earlier this year when gold topped $1,000 an ounce, Gibbons, a former mining geologist and lawyer, vowed to veto any bill that called for increasing mining taxes in 2009.

November 2008 (Vol. 78, No. 3)
Montana Tunnels Gets Final OK

Operators of the Montana Tunnels mine about 25 miles south of Helena have final approval to expand it.

December 2008 (Vol. 78, No. 4)
Chavez Eyes Venezuela’s Largest Gold Mine

Venezuela announced plans to take over the nation’s largest gold mine, operated by Canada’s Crystallex International Corp., as President Hugo Chavez gradually brings mining operations under state control.

December 2008 (Vol. 78, No. 4)
Chinese Gold Consumption to Grow

When the final numbers are in, China will have consumed a record 350 tons of gold in 2006 amid surging sales of gold bullion, up 17 percent from 2005, the official Xinhua News Agency reported.

January 2007 (Vol. 76, No. 5)
Family Sues US Mint for Return of Rare Gold Coins

In a federal lawsuit, a family claims the US Mint illegally seized 10 gold coins that the family had found among a dead relative’s possessions.

January 2007 (Vol. 76, No. 5)
High Court Reverses Nevada Mining Decision

The Nevada Supreme Court ruling last April in a Newmont Mining Corp. gold mine case was erased by a high court panel.

January 2007 (Vol. 76, No. 5)
Mining Industry Worried about Democrat-Controlled Congress

The new Democrat-controlled Congress will be largely hostile to the US mining industry on everything from taxes to environmental regulation, a top industry lobbyist warned.

January 2007 (Vol. 76, No. 5)
Palladium Hitting Jewelry Market

When Frank McAllister talks about palladium, his passion is palpable. So when the Stillwater Mining Co. CEO compares the precious metal to a fairy-tale princess, one can’t help but wait for the explanation.

January 2007 (Vol. 76, No. 5)
Demand for Copper Boosts Zambian Mining

Surging global demand for copper has breathed new life into the mining industry in Chingola, a short drive from the Congolese border on top of some of the richest copper deposits in the world.

February 2007 (Vol. 76, No.6)
San Manuel Mine Officially Closes With a Bang

One of the largest underground copper mines in the world officially closed mid-January, as demolition crews blasted its twin smelter stacks.

February 2007 (Vol. 76, No.6)
Internet Posting Fuels Gold Rush in Brazilian Town

It’s a gold rush in the Amazon jungle, driven by the Internet.

March 2007 (Vol. 76, No. 7)
North Idaho Mine to Open Again in 2008

The Sunshine Mine in northern Idaho could start running again in 2008.

March 2007 (Vol. 76, No. 7)
Working Life of Troy Mine Could Be Extended

An exploration project at the Troy Mine Complex in northwest Montana could extend the projected six or seven year life of the mine by another 5 to 10 years, officials with Revett Minerals say.

March 2007 (Vol. 76, No. 7)
Swiss Mining Company Demands Compensation From Bolivia

Glencore International AG demanded compensation from Bolivia’s government for nationalizing a tin smelter owned by the Swiss mining company.

March 2007 (Vol. 76, No. 7)
Mining Boom Is Back In Northern Nevada

At the Gold Quarry open-pit mine, a massive electric shovel scoops 40 tons of earth in a single bite and dumps it into a 325,000-pound truck the size of a two-story house.

April 2007 (Vol. 76, No.8)
Lease Issued For Potential Mine Near Mount St. Helens

A hardrock minerals lease and environmental assessment issued recently give Idaho General Mines the right to apply to explore property near 5,400-foot Goat Mountain, north and east of the Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument.

April 2007 (Vol. 76, No.8)
Colorado Court Rules on Cyanide Ban

The Colorado state Court of Appeals ruled that counties have the authority to ban the use of cyanide in gold mining.

May 2007 (Vol.76, No.9)
More Small-Scale Miners Attracted by Gold Prices

With gold hovering above $650 an ounce, interest in panning and prospecting for the pricey precious metal in northern Idaho’s icy streams and on its rugged mountainsides has enjoyed a mini-boom.

July 2007 (Vol. 76, No. 11)
Ready “Ore” Not, Uranium Boom is On Again

Plans for 100 new nuclear power plants around the world have pushed the price of uranium skyward and set off a frenzy of exploration in western Colorado and Utah.

July 2007 (Vol. 76, No. 11)
Spanish Police Seize Ship in Treasure Fight

Spanish Civil Guards heightened a battle over a $500 million treasure of gold and silver coins from a shipwreck when they seized a vessel belonging to a Tampa, Florida company.

August 2007 (Vol. 76, No. 12)
Gold Mine Proposed in Jefferson County

What could be the first underground gold mine to open in Montana in at least a decade is proposed near the ghost town of Elkhorn in Jefferson County, Montana.

August 2007 (Vol. 76, No. 12)
Prison Time Handed Out for Gold and Silver Thefts

The ringleader of former mining workers accused of stealing $1.7 million in gold and silver from Cripple Creek & Victor Gold Mining is headed to prison, prosecutors said.

September 2007 (Vol. 77, No. 1)
Northern Dynasty Chooses Partner for Pebble

The Canadian company that owns the Pebble Mine prospect has partnered with Anglo American to develop the Pebble project in Southwest Alaska.

September 2007 (Vol. 77, No. 1)
An Answer to Endangered Salmon?

Papa salmon plus mama salmon equals ... baby trout? Japanese researchers put a new spin on surrogate parenting as they engineered one fish species to produce another, in a quest to preserve endangered fish.

October 2007 (Vol. 77, No. 2)
The Risks of Mining Overseas

Zimbabwe is the latest country to threaten seizure of foreign-owned mining projects.

November 2007 (Vol. 77, No. 3)
Alaska and Nevada Continue to Lead the Pack

Alaska’s mining industry posted a record-breaking year in 2006, largely because of the high prices for zinc and other metals, state officials said.

December 2007 (Vol 77, No. 4)
Landowners See Potential Gold Mine in Uranium Ore

A group of Pittsylvania County landowners sitting on 92 million pounds of uranium ore wants Virginia to end its 25-year ban on uranium mining.

December 2007 (Vol 77, No. 4)
Feds Raid “Liberty Dollar” Headquarters

Federal agents seized two tons of copper coins featuring Republican presidential candidate Ron Paul and 500 pounds of silver during a raid on the headquarters of a group seeking to dissolve the Federal Reserve.

December 2007 (Vol 77, No. 4)
Feds Move Oil Shale to Front Burner

A recent hearing on federal plans to unlock oil shale reserves in the Intermountain West was packed by small-time speculators, some of whom questioned whether today’s technology would let them squeeze oil out of rock profitably.

February 2006 (Vol. 75, No. 6)
Trout Thriving In Treated Mine Water

West Virginia University water scientists have found that rainbow trout can survive in previously polluted waters.

March 2006 (Vol. 75, No 7)
Copper Mine Opening in Utah

A second copper mine is opening in Utah with prices for the metal at their highest in a decade.

April 2006 (Vol. 75, No. 8)
Future of Mining in Bolivia Uncertain

The miners offer the still-beating hearts of four freshly-sacrificed llamas to a statue of the fiendish god “El Tio,” who they believe affords them protection and good luck.

April 2006 (Vol. 75, No. 8)
For a Few Specks of Gold

The gold at the Ruby Hill Mine is microscopic, specks of specks that amount to a few ounces in every 100 tons of rock. It is embedded hundreds of feet beneath the rocky floor of the high desert, tawny and stubbled with sagebrush, toothy ridges dusted with snow.

June 2006 (Vol. 75, No. 10)
Miners Rescued After Two Weeks

Two Australian miners who survived for two weeks in a kennel-size cage trapped 3,000 feet underground walked out of the Beaconsfield Gold Mine and punched the air, freed by rescue crews drilling round-the-clock by hand.

June 2006 (Vol. 75, No. 10)
Mining Firms Uneasy Over Bolivia

Bolivia’s plan to nationalize its natural gas industry and exert greater state control over all of its natural resources has North American mining companies fretting over their future prospects extracting the nation’s rich resources of gold, silver and tin.

June 2006 (Vol. 75, No. 10)
China to Set Up Strategic Reserves

China plans to set up strategic reserves for key minerals such as copper, uranium and aluminum, the government said, acting to ensure supplies amid record high prices due to soaring demand.

June 2006 (Vol. 75, No. 10)
Mongolia Tax May Chase Off Investment

The gold and copper deposits at Oyu Tolgoi, or “Turquoise Hill,” are among the largest ever found and could give impoverished Mongolia its biggest boost since it abandoned communism 15 years ago—if the Mongolians can figure out how to profit from it.

June 2006 (Vol. 75, No. 10)
Montana Postpones Mining Rule

A proposal to toughen mine regulation in Montana was tabled by a state board while a block away, Governor Brian Schweitzer met with mining executives to get their comments on the rule and hear about the mining industry.

July 2006 (Vol. 75, No. 11)
Agnico-Eagle to Open Gold Mine in Finland

Agnico-Eagle Mines will open Europe’s largest gold mine in northern Finland in 2008, the Canadian company and local officials said.

July 2006 (Vol. 75, No. 11)
Microbes Play Role in Gold Creation

Researchers in Australia have uncovered evidence that a tiny microbe may have the Midas touch of Greek legend, capable of turning dust to gold.

August 2006 (Vol. 75, No. 12)
Elections May Bring Rush to Republic of Congo

Elections in the Republic of Congo may bring a mining boom to a country that has been ravaged by wars and corruption.

August 2006 (Vol. 75, No. 12)
Another Uranium Boom in the West

The last US uranium mill ever built, in this parched landscape near Lake Powell, shut down quickly after it started operating as nuclear power fell into disfavor about two decades ago.

October 2006 (Vol. 76, No. 2)
Final Buckhorn Mountain Study Released

The Washington Department of Ecology recently issued a revised environmental study of a proposed Okanogan County gold mine. The study is an amendment to one done in 1997 for the proposed Crown Jewel open pit mine on Buckhorn Mountain near Chesaw.

October 2006 (Vol. 76, No. 2)
Government Says New Mine Will Benefit Bears

Grizzly bears stand to benefit if a copper and silver mine is developed beneath Montana’s Cabinet Mountains Wilderness, the US Fish and Wildlife Service said in a rewritten opinion.

November 2006 (Vol. 76, No. 3)
Trio Accused of Stealing $1.7 Million in Gold

Three former employees of a Colorado gold mine face charges of stealing more than $1.7 million in unprocessed gold, prosecutors said.

November 2006 (Vol. 76, No. 3)
Wyoming Expects Profits from Uranium

Growth in worldwide demand for uranium is leading producers back to Wyoming, which leads the nation in uranium production.

November 2006 (Vol. 76, No. 3)
Smugglers Causing Problems in South Africa

Rogue miners in South Africa are looting underground mines, sometimes traveling over one-thousand feet down to extract gold, reported Reuters and several other sources.

December 2006 (Vol. 76, No. 4)
Market Spotlight: Platinum in Demand

Platinum has run to record highs this year, but it’s not a rush of demand for wedding bands that has boosted prices. It’s diesel.

December 2006 (Vol. 76, No. 4)
Mining Companies Use Conservative Valuations

Gold mining companies are being conservative in asset valuations despite recent spikes in gold prices in terms of US dollars, according to a survey by PricewaterhouseCoopers.

January 2005 (Vol. 74, No. 5)
Tongass Approves Kensington Mine Plan

Coeur Alaska’s plan to develop the Kensington gold mine and dispose of its tailings in a lake has been approved by the Tongass National Forest.

February 2005 (Vol. 74, No. 6)
BC Premier Heralds "Golden Decade" in Forestry and Mining

British Columbia is poised for a “golden decade” in forestry and mining, Premier Gordon Campbell says.

February 2005 (Vol. 74, No. 6)
Claim Filings Up in the Northwest

Higher gold prices have led to a doubling of mining claims in the past year in Oregon and Washington.

February 2005 (Vol. 74, No. 6)
Canadian Officials Foresee Little Impact From Mine

Canadian regulators said they have found no significant environmental impacts from a proposed British Columbia mine near the Alaska border.

February 2005 (Vol. 74, No. 6)
Coeur d'Alene Mines Sees Future in Bolivia

Coeur d’Alene Mines newest silver project has found a home in a historic Bolivian mining district.
The company will build a $135 million open-pit mine at the base of Cerro Rico, the “rich hill” that was the site of a 1545 silver strike.

February 2005 (Vol. 74, No. 6)
$100 Million Lost on Faulty ESA Listing

The Preble’s meadow jumping mouse, once seen as a costly impediment to development, is now viewed by the government as a critter that never really existed—and is no longer in need of federal protection under the Endangered Species Act.

March 2005 (Vol. 74, No. 7)
Philippines Asks Foreigners to Invest in Mining

Philippine President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo and other officials urged international businesses to invest in the country’s mining industry after the Supreme Court cleared the way for foreigners to fully control mining operations in the country.

March 2005 (Vol. 74, No. 7)
China Ups Investment in Foreign Minerals

Direct investment overseas by Chinese companies rose 27 percent over a year earlier to $3.6 billion in 2004, highlighting the country’s growing economic influence, the government reported.

March 2005 (Vol. 74, No. 7)
Government Appeals Miner Injury Case to Supreme Court

The Supreme Court said it will consider whether two miners may sue federal officials for personal injuries following a roof collapse at a copper mine that left them paralyzed.

April 2005 (Vol. 74, No. 8)
Diamond Search Underway in Alaska and Minnesota

Two Canadian companies are financing a $1 million drilling operation in the Susitna Valley after a Palmer miner discovered purple and orange garnets in gravel he dredged near Shulin Lake.

May 2005 (Vol. 74, No.9)
Mining Outfits Eye 50-Year Supply of Iron Ore

Two companies are looking to mine the largest known iron ore deposit in the West—a 50-year supply at a rate of 1 million metric tons a year.

May 2005 (Vol. 74, No.9)
Couple Creates Jewelry of the Iron Range

Bryan and Teresa Sandnas’ idea of turning taconite into high-quality jewelry seemed as brilliant as ... well, a lump of iron ore. But what seemed like an implausible plan has turned a crude Iron Range resource into small pieces of beauty.

May 2005 (Vol. 74, No.9)
Companies Scramble to Boost Copper Production

Soaring prices for copper and molybdenum are producing record profits for mining companies and new jobs in some Arizona towns.

June 2005 (Vol. 74, No. 10)
Mining Sisters Make History

Judy Etherton wasn’t out to make headlines or break any barriers when she entered the mining industry more than 30 years ago.

June 2005 (Vol. 74, No. 10)
New Regulations for Major Precious Metal Dealers

The Bush administration, in its latest effort to nab drug lords and terror financiers, will require major dealers in gold, diamonds and other precious metals and gems to set up comprehensive programs to combat money laundering, announced the Treasury Department.

July 2005 (Vol. 74, No. 11)
9th Circuit Court Hears Pilgrim Family Case

An attorney for the Pilgrim family told federal appeals judges that the National Park Service has no right to conduct a formal environmental review or create other roadblocks before granting access to their land within a national park.

August 2005 (Vol. 74, No. 12)
National Mining Hall of Fame to Induct Five

Ceremonies  for the induction of five mining industry pioneers into the National Mining Hall of Fame will be held Saturday, September 17, 2005 at the Museum Convention Center in Leadville.

August 2005 (Vol. 74, No. 12)
Explosives Camp Lets Students Explore Booming Career Path

Ahhh, summer camp. Lazy days frolicking at the pool. Meeting new friends and swapping stories around the campfire. Slicing steel I-beams and concrete pillars and blowing them apart with C4 high explosives.

September 2005 (Vol. 75, No. 1)
The Best Copper Town Anywhere

In the high desert hills more than 60 miles west of Prescott, Bagdad’s residents chat about the Wednesday golf league, the girls softball team and the new cafeteria over at the school.

September 2005 (Vol. 75, No. 1)
EPA Offers Liability Protection to Spur Cleanups

Environmental groups that volunteer to help government and businesses clean up waste from mine drainage in the West won’t be held liable if there are future disputes over the pollution, the Environmental Protection Agency said.

October 2005 (Vol. 75, No. 2)
Study: West Has Vast Oil Shale Reserves

The United States has an oil reserve at least three times that of Saudi Arabia locked in oil shale deposits beneath federal land in Colorado, Utah and Wyoming, according to a study released August 31.

October 2005 (Vol. 75, No. 2)
Mining Companies Competing for Labor

Brian Barclay makes a 275-mile commute across Colorado every week to work near this dusty little town, drawn by a natural gas boom that has added trucks, cranes and hundreds of people to the rocky landscape.

November 2005 (Vol. 75, No. 3)
Venezuela’s Chavez Halts Mining Projects

Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez said his government has decided to review and possibly cancel all mining concessions, and stop issuing new ones to foreign companies.

November 2005 (Vol. 75, No. 3)
Montana Lawmakers Want Economic Review of New Mining Rule

A group of lawmakers is asking the state to review the economic effects of a new mining law that one lawmaker contends is nothing more than a thinly veiled effort to end all mining in Montana.

November 2005 (Vol. 75, No. 3)
Adding Shine to Your Portfolio

As inflation fears grow, some advisers are steering their clients into precious or industrial metals as a way to add luster to portfolios.

December 2005 (Vol. 75, No. 4)
Consider Adding Gold to Your Portfolio

One of the biggest surprises on Wall Street during 2003 was the extraordinary performance of gold-oriented mutual funds—investments that normally fall as the stock market rises.

February 2004 (Vol. 73, No. 6)
US Files Charges Against Gold Refiner

Authorities filed criminal charges against one of the largest gold refiners in the United States, accusing the company of participating in an illegal, $4.5 million money-laundering operation involving tainted gold from South America for at least four months.

February 2004 (Vol. 73, No. 6)
Fraser Institute Ranks Best Regions for Mining Investment

Attractive geology does not guarantee mining investment if a region’s policies are bad, say mining executives surveyed in the seventh Annual Survey of Mining Companies released by The Fraser Institute.

March 2004 (Vol. 73, No. 7)
Gold Mine Plans Upheld in Lawsuit

Officials for the largest gold producing company in the world claimed a significant legal victory over environmentalists who they accused of abusing the appeals process to thwart mining in Nevada.

May 2004 (Vol. 73, No. 9)
Higher Copper Price Brings Hope, Jobs

Buoyed by higher copper prices, Chino Mines is reopening its ore concentrator and hiring workers.

June 2004 (Vol. 73, No. 10)
Agreement Allows Pogo Mine to Resume Construction

An agreement between developer Teck-Pogo and an environmental group will allow construction work to resume on the Pogo gold mine.

June 2004 (Vol. 73, No. 10)
Agency Gives Initial Backing to Kensington Mine

A state funding agency has given the initial OK to financing $20 million in debt to move the Kensington gold project near Juneau toward becoming a working mine.

June 2004 (Vol. 73, No. 10)
Brits Thwart Robbery of Gold and Cash

Armed officers arrested seven men near Heathrow Airport after they had overpowered staff at a warehouse holding £80 million ($236 million) in gold and cash and began loading gold into the back of a van.

June 2004 (Vol. 73, No. 10)
Map Offers Look at Butte's Mining History

It turns out the old Anaconda Co. really did have 10,000 miles of tunnels beneath this mining city. That’s one of the findings by researchers who have produced a new map that charts the thousands of underground mine shafts here, providing a detailed look at some of Butte’s mining history.

July 2004 (Vol. 73, No. 11)
Kerry Proposes Large Fees on Miners

John Kerry’s proposal to increase mineral royalties to raise money for national parks has drawn strong opposition from officials and mining interests in Nevada, which produces 81 percent of the nation’s gold.

September 2004 (Vol. 74, No. 1)
Is a Gold Rush Coming to the Iron Range?

Scientists from the state Department of Natural Resources reported that they recently discovered the highest concentrations of gold particles ever found in the state during routine soil sampling near Soudan.

September 2004 (Vol. 74, No. 1)
Coeur Alaska Hopes to Begin Work on Gold Mine This Fall

On a recent afternoon, Rick Richins fished a large piece of quartzite ore studded with glittering particles from the floor of a dark, dripping tunnel at the Kensington gold mine.

September 2004 (Vol. 74, No. 1)
Company Plans to Develop Cabinet Mountains Mine

A Spokane mining company says it plans to develop a silver and copper mine in the Cabinet Mountains Wilderness Area on the Idaho-Montana border.

September 2004 (Vol. 74, No. 1)
First Load of Concentrate Leaves Reopened Ruth Mine

Five years after depressed copper prices forced the Robinson mine to shut down, the first truckload of concentrate pulled out in what its new owner sees as a renewal of the facility and Ely-area residents hope is a rebirth of the region.

November 2004 (Vol. 74, No. 3)
Police Extend Detention of Newmont Executives

Five executives from the American mining giant Newmont will continue to be jailed while facing pollution charges in Indonesia, police said, despite test results that show “normal” mercury levels near a former gold mine.

November 2004 (Vol. 74, No. 3)
Diamonds in the Rough in Montana

The bright green rocks jutting through the prairie soil were hard to miss, but Tom Charlton still couldn’t believe his eyes. It was kimberlite, the molten rock in which diamonds are found, and preliminary tests had yielded a microscopic diamond.

December 2004 (Vol. 74, No. 4)
Michigan House Committee Approves Sulfide Mining Regulations

Michigan would have one of the toughest sets of rules for sulfide mining in the nation under legislation approved by a state House committee.

December 2004 (Vol. 74, No. 4)
Surging Gold Prices Add Luster to Nevada's No. 2 Industry

Higher gold prices helped boost Nevada’s mining industry in 2003 despite a decline in production for the third straight year.

December 2004 (Vol. 74, No. 4)
Ruby Hill Gold Mine to Reopen in Eureka

Barrick Gold Corp. is moving forward with the reopening of the Ruby Hill gold mine at Eureka, Nevada, and intends to begin work next month on a new power plant in western Nevada.

December 2004 (Vol. 74, No. 4)
Newmont Welcomes Release of Executives

Newmont Mining welcomed the release of five executives who were being detained in Indonesia over claims that the company polluted Buyat Bay in central Indonesia.

December 2004 (Vol. 74, No. 4)
Impact of Habitat Designations Grossly Underestimated

A UC Berkeley professor says the federal government is using an analysis method that seriously underestimates the economic impact of critical habitat designations for imperiled species.

April 2003 (Vol. 72, No. 8)
City Gives Blessing to Pogo Mine

City officials favor construction of the Pogo gold mine near their community, they said at a public comment meeting on the mine conducted by the government agencies responsible for issuing permits for the $250 million project.

June 2003 (Vol. 72, No. 10)
Payette Forest Sides With Mining Company

The US Forest Service is siding with a mining company’s bid to reopen roads and drill test holes in the Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness.

June 2003 (Vol. 72, No. 10)
Feds Release Opinion on Planned Mine Under Montana Wilderness

A proposed silver and copper mine that would burrow under a wilderness area in northwestern Montana will not affect bull trout, nor will it harm grizzly bears so long as some additional precautions are taken, federal wildlife authorities said.

June 2003 (Vol. 72, No. 10)
Montana Candidate Sees Natural Resources as Path to Recovery

The key to returning Montana’s economy to its glory days is to remove the laws that prevent development of the state’s natural resources, says Thomas Keating, the only Republican who has declared himself a candidate for governor.

August 2003 (Vol. 72, No. 12)
Maine to Create Mineral Park

The Maine Geological Survey is raising money to acquire a cluster of world-famous mines and create the state’s first public mineral park for rockhounds, science teachers and others with an interest in rocks and minerals.

August 2003 (Vol. 72, No. 12)
Brighter Days Ahead Reports Nevada Mining Association

A new report predicts brighter days for mining in Nevada if the price of gold maintains at current levels.

October 2003 (Vol. 73, No. 2)
Deadly Storms May Expose Gems in Sri Lanka

Floods and landslides that struck Sri Lanka several months ago, killing 266 people, may bring a windfall for miners. The movement of tons of soil and rock is believed to have unearthed new gems according to local industry workers.

October 2003 (Vol. 73, No. 2)
Judge Holds Companies Liable for Some Damage

A federal judge found mining companies liable for at least some of the costs of cleaning up pollution of Idaho’s Silver Valley from a century of mining.

October 2003 (Vol. 73, No. 2)
Buckhorn Mountain Project May Be Revived

The long-delayed Buckhorn Mountain gold mine project has been purchased by one of North America’s largest gold producers. Kinross Gold Corp. plans to begin mining there within two years.

November 2003 (Vol. 73, No. 3)
USFS Criticized for Renting Chopper in Nevada Dispute

The Forest Service is being criticized for spending $15,000 to rent a helicopter to empty sewage from a remote outhouse in northeast Nevada, work a citizens group had volunteered to do for free by using a closed forest road that the group wants reopened.

November 2003 (Vol. 73, No. 3)
New Guinea Denies Existence of Gold Stash

Wild rumors sweeping this near bankrupt Pacific nation of a multibillion dollar stash of World War II gold bullion are wrong, the government said.

November 2003 (Vol. 73, No. 3)
Miners Welcome Comments by Alaska Official

The head of Alaska’s Department of Environmental Conservation angered environmentalists by saying more than enough acres are being managed for conservation and land set-asides aren’t necessary for environmental protection.

December 2003 (Vol. 73, No. 4)
Mining Deaths Drop to New Low in 2001

Fatal injuries at mines in the United States declined last year to a historic new low, according to preliminary data released January 3, 2002, by the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA).

February 2002 (Vol. 71, No. 6)
Fabled 1933 Gold Coin Up For Sale

A 1933 Double Eagle gold coin that never went into circulation—but triggered decades of intrigue—is being sold by the federal government at auction this summer. Experts predict it could sell for millions.

March 2002 (Vol. 71, No. 7)
North Korea Seeks Outside Help to Modernize Mining

Eager to earn hard currency, isolated North Korea is trying to modernize its decrepit mining industry with foreign help.

March 2002 (Vol. 71, No. 7)
NAS Agrees to Review Superfund Science

The National Academy of Sciences has taken a step toward reviewing a proposed cleanup plan in Idaho.

June 2002 (Vol. 71, No. 10)
Tight Budgets Force Forest Service to Cut Back

Seasonal wilderness-area rangers have been among the first to go as Forest Service managers juggle budget demands.

June 2002 (Vol. 71, No. 10)
Company Looks at Restarting Sunshine Mine

The lights are on again in the Sunshine silver mine as a New Orleans company investigates whether it is profitable to buy the operation.

July 2002 (Vol. 71, No. 11)
Bill Could Create New Silver Market

Legislation before Congress would enable the federal government to become a net silver buyer for the first time in four decades.

July 2002 (Vol. 71, No. 11)
Mystery of Olmec Jade Solved

Since the 18th century, collectors, geologists and archaeologists have sought the answer to a frustrating mystery: The ancient Olmecs fashioned statues out of striking blue-green jade, but the stone itself was nowhere to be found in the Americas.

July 2002 (Vol. 71, No. 11)
BLM Land Swap Deal Raises Eyebrows

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Washington D.C. is reviewing a land swap with a private company because the bureau allowed an employee of the company to arrange the deal.

August 2002 (Vol. 71, No. 12)
Sunshine Mine Video Brings Back Painful Memories

When a federal employee decided to make a safety video for miners, she didn’t expect to reopen 30-year-old wounds from one of the nation’s worst mining disasters. But a roomful of tough men had watery eyes as they watched the film “You Are My Sunshine,” which recounted the Sunshine Mine disaster of 1972 that claimed 91 lives.

October 2002 (Vol. 72, No. 2)
Explorers to Salvage Gold-Laden Ship

A salvage company struck a 20-year deal with Britain to search for riches in the sunken warship HMS Sussex, which went down in 1694, laden with gold and silver.

November 2002 (Vol. 72, No. 3)
Columbians Continue Search for Emeralds

Despite a drop in emerald production in Colombia, “green fever” still burns among miners who yearn to find a stone big or pure enough to answer all their worldy needs.

December 2002 (Vol. 72, No. 4)
Alaska Miners to Sue Department of Interior

The Alaska Miners Association announced that it will sue the Department of Interior to set aside Solicitor John Leshy’s “midnight” regulations designed to drive the mining industry out of business in Alaska.

February 2001 (Vol. 70, No. 6)
Oregon's Measure 7 May Provide Compensation for Land-Use Restrictions

Opponents of Measure 7 warn that it will grow into a monster.

February 2001 (Vol. 70, No. 6)
Babbitt Wants Moratorium in Siskiyou National Forest

February 2001 (Vol. 70, No. 6)
Gem Discoveries Sought in North Carolina Field

The gem miner who uncovered North America’s largest emerald thinks he’s found a mother-lode of emerald-rich rock in Alexander County.

February 2001 (Vol. 70, No. 6)
Gem Theft in Tucson

Police are investigating the theft of five stones, valued by their owner at $128,000, from an exhibit at a Tucson gem show.The largest of the stones taken from the show was a 7-inch-tall pink tourmaline worth $85,000.

March 2001 (Vol. 70, No. 7)
Mine Forced to Pay for Grizzly Habitat and More

The Rock Creek Mine, a silver and copper mine proposed for the southern Cabinets near Noxon, Mont., will mean more human-bear confrontations and a shrinking bear habitat, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says.

April 2001 (Vol. 70, No. 8)
Court Hears Arguments Over Rights to Shipwreck

Nearly a century after the luxury liner RMS Republic sank off Nantucket, treasure hunters are still battling over the ship’s cargo, which some believe includes gold coins now worth more than $1 billion.

May 2001 (Vol. 70, No. 9)
Nevada Gold Production Up Despite Lower Prices

Despite lower prices, Nevada gold production increased slightly last year and the state continues to produce about three-fourths of the nation’s gold.

May 2001 (Vol. 70, No. 9)
Bush Taps Utah Resident for Labor Post

President Bush has said he will nominate a Utah mining consultant to become Assistant Secretary of Labor for Mine Safety and Health (MSHA).

May 2001 (Vol. 70, No. 9)
Honda Pares Down Use of Precious Metals in Autos

Honda Motor Co. said it will begin using new catalytic converter technology it believes will slash use of  pricey precious metals in auto emission-control systems by 50 to 70 percent.

May 2001 (Vol. 70, No. 9)
Nebraska Couple Finds Big Nugget in Arizona

Friends of Don and Marlene Doran often tease them about their hobby of searching for unique rocks. Now they are the ones laughing.

June 2001 (Vol. 70, No. 10)
Investors Hope to Revive Idaho Gold Mine

A small group of investors led by retired businessman Ray Bohn is trying to revive a remote Idaho gold mine shut down since 1942.

June 2001 (Vol. 70, No. 10)
Former Sunshine Miners Find Work in Montana

Like almost 200 other Silver Valley miners, Butch Dempsey used to work at the Sunshine Mine in Kellogg. But, along with dozens of the others, he now works for the Columbus, Montana-based Stillwater Mining Co., about 400 miles to the east...

July 2001 (Vol. 70, No. 11)
Diamond Dealer Prevails in Congo

The one he’s rolling around in his fingers is nice—5.23 carats, nearly the size of a marble, pure and white. But the diamond that Alphonse Ngoyi Kasanji is talking about is the big one—the one that got taken away.

July 2001 (Vol. 70, No. 11)
Proposal Submitted for Lab at Homestake

Rapid City, S.D. (AP)—Scientists and a team of South Dakotans have submitted a $281 million, five-year plan to turn Homestake Mine in Lead into the world’s largest underground laboratory.

July 2001 (Vol. 70, No. 11)
De Beers Undergoes Overhaul

Behind every diamond engagement ring, every diamond earring, every glittering, multicarat expression of true love once loomed the shadow of De Beers, the cartel that controlled—and, some argue, created—the international diamond industry.

August 2001 (Vol. 70, No. 12)
New Arsenic Study Supports Tougher Standards

A National Academy of Sciences report shows that the Environmental Protection Agency greatly underestimated the cancer risks of arsenic in drinking water, according to EPA officials and other environmental experts familiar with the report.

October 2001 (Vol. 71, No. 2)
Miners Resume Search for Platinum Near Platinum

Goodnews Bay Platinum Mine, owned by Hanson Industries in Spokane, Washington, has resurrected a 60-year-old bucketline dredge to claw the steel-gray metal from the river drainages around Red Mountain on Cape Nushagak.

October 2001 (Vol. 71, No. 2)
Tons of Gold Buried Under World Trade Center

Some 11.8 metric tons of gold worth an estimated $110 million, and 30.2 million ounces of silver valued at $121 million, are buried in the rubble below one of the collapsed buildings in the World Trade Center, The New York Times report

October 2001 (Vol. 71, No. 2)
Gold Rush Ship Uncovered in San Francisco

Workers at a hotel construction site uncovered a Gold Rush-era ship that had been buried for decades under the streets of the city’s Financial District.

October 2001 (Vol. 71, No. 2)
Permit Appears Likely for Rock Creek Mine

The final environmental review for a proposed mine beneath the Cabinet Mountains Wilderness appears, after 14 years, to favor allowing the hotly disputed mine to proceed.

October 2001 (Vol. 71, No. 2)
President Bush: Put ANWR Drilling in Energy Bill

President Bush has urged Congress to adopt comprehensive energy legislation, which includes drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR).

November 2001 (Vol. 71, No. 3)
Administration Considers Bypassing Congress

With Congress showing little willingness to act, the Clinton administration is weighing whether to designate a dozen scenic and historic sites in the West as federal monuments to assure their protection.

January 2000 (Vol. 69, No. 5)
First Woman to Draw Mining Pension

For generations, men willing to endure physical labor have been able to make a decent living working as miners on the Marquette Iron Range. But it has been only in the last 25 years that the open-pit facilities have given women the opportunity to roll up their sleeves and dig into hard labor.

January 2000 (Vol. 69, No. 5)
High Court to Reconsider Wilderness Water Rights

The Idaho Supreme Court agreed on November 30 to reconsider its controversial split decision to award the federal government the rights to all unappropriated Salmon River water flowing through three central Idaho wilderness areas.

January 2000 (Vol. 69, No. 5)
Clinton Declares Three More National Monuments

President Clinton took a helicopter tour of the Grand Canyon yesterday, then put his pen to paper to designate three more areas as national monuments and expand several others.

February 2000 (Vol. 69, No. 6)
McCain Derides Clinton Forest Policy

Sen. John McCain stated recently that if elected president, he would overturn President Clinton's executive order putting more national forest land off-limits to logging.

February 2000 (Vol. 69, No. 6)
Foreigners Lure Mining Partners

There was a foreign presence at the annual Northwest Mining Association convention in December.

February 2000 (Vol. 69, No. 6)
Pacific Island Gov'ts Focus on Undersea Mining

Pacific Island nations have started devising regulatory laws to help create a new industry in this near-resourceless region: mining the sea floor.

February 2000 (Vol. 69, No. 6)
Options Narrowed for Managing Chugach National Forest

Planners are narrowing their options for managing the 5.3 million-acre area Chugach National Forest.

February 2000 (Vol. 69, No. 6)
New Quarry Regulations in West Virginia

Quarry operators would face tighter state regulations under proposed legislation that moved a step closer to approval recently.

February 2000 (Vol. 69, No. 6)
Ash Fork Calm After Explosives Theft

The tiny, unincorporated town of Ash Fork blazed into the national spotlight with the announcement that 1,000 pounds of explosives were stolen from a nearby mine.

February 2000 (Vol. 69, No. 6)
Collector Reaches New Lows to Find Bottles

Not everyone would admit to digging through old outhouse pits, but George Piasecki says it's all part of the game for a bottle collector.

February 2000 (Vol. 69, No. 6)
Visionaries, Scoundrels, and Gamblers

Ask leading historians to name Colorado's top 10 builders and the list quickly grows to 50 people. The list includes visionaries, scoundrels and gamblers.

February 2000 (Vol. 69, No. 6)
Executive Defends Special Mill Site Exemption

Hardrock mining never would have happened in the United States if a recent interpretation of the nation's mining law had been in effect in the 1890s, a mining executive says.

February 2000 (Vol. 69, No. 6)
Chasing the Ghosts of Forty-Niners

Plodding in the footsteps of the forty-niners across the sun-baked Nevada desert, I feel the ghost of a man named Israel Lord tap me on the shoulder.

February 2000 (Vol. 69, No. 6)
Washoe County Balks at Black Rock Desert Plan

The Washoe County Commission raised concerns about Sen. Richard Bryan's tentative proposal to protect the Black Rock Desert...

February 2000 (Vol. 69, No. 6)
State's Only Gold Mine Processes Last Precious Ore

South Carolina's last operating mine, Kennecott Ridgeway, processed the final gold and silver it had extracted from two pits in southern Fairfield County.  But even though the mining and processing is done, the work at Kennecott is far from over...

February 2000 (Vol. 69, No. 6)
Group Sues Feds Over New Nat'l Monuments

Several Arizona lawmakers and Utah ranchers filed suit against the federal government over the creation of a national monument in northern Arizona.

March 2000 (Vol. 69, No. 7)
Tribe Joins Idaho in Roadless Suit

The Kootenai Tribe has joined Idaho Attorney General AI Lance's suit against the U.S. Forest Service over the Clinton administration's bid to set aside millions of forested acres in the state.

March 2000 (Vol. 69, No. 7)
10,000 Shovels Back Protest

Gov. Kenny Guinn added his backing to a protest against the Forest Service in Elko as an estimated 10,000 shovels arrived in Nevada in a show of support from loggers, ranchers and miners across the country.

March 2000 (Vol. 69, No. 7)
Wyoming Tops in Royalties

Wyoming received the largest amount of revenues associated with mineral leases on federal lands within its borders last year.

March 2000 (Vol. 69, No. 7)
Treasures for Sale

A Wolfeboro company will sell portions of one of the most talked about treasures in American history.

March 2000 (Vol. 69, No. 7)
"Gold" Coin Debuts

For the first time, the Sacagawea Golden Dollar changed hands, intermingling with scuffed quarters and nickels, setting itself apart with its golden hue.

March 2000 (Vol. 69, No. 7)
Uranium Miners May Be Compensated

Residents who worked in uranium mines before 1972 may be eligible for compensation through a federal program.

April 2000 (Vol. 69, No. 8)
Dairy Farmer Hits Pay Dirt

Gary Tainter sold his herd of dairy cows two years ago to dig for gold, and so far his venture is paying off.

April 2000 (Vol. 69, No. 8)
Alaska Mining Industry Sees 5% Growth in 1999

For the fourth straight year, the state's mining industry broke the billion-dollar mark in revenue, according to a state report.

April 2000 (Vol. 69, No. 8)
Platinum Prices Could Spur Wyoming Rush

Rising platinum prices could lead to a rush in southeastern Wyoming, one of the few places in the world where the metal is found, a state geologist said.

April 2000 (Vol. 69, No. 8)
Ruling Awards Giant Nugget to Finder

A court ruled that a taxi driver and amateur prospector who unearthed a 14.5-pound (6.6-kg) gold nugget on someone else's land is allowed to keep it.

June 2000 (Vol. 69, No. 10)
Traditional Adversaries Reach Agreement

The Stillwater Mining Company and three citizen watchdog groups have signed a 38-page accord that creates a new relationship between the traditional adversaries and could set an example for resource development decisions in the West.

June 2000 (Vol. 69, No. 10)
Quick Thinking & Rescue Devices Save Two Lives

MSHA (Mine Safety and Health Administration) reports that a pair of miners used oxygen-supplying self-rescue devices to save two of their co-workers who were in danger of suffocation at the Ohio Valley Coal Company's Powhatan No.6 mine near St. Clairsville, Ohio.

June 2000 (Vol. 69, No. 10)
Prospector Finds Cache of Emeralds in North Carolina

"This is just the tip of the iceberg," Hill said. "It's going to take 200 years to dig it all out."

June 2000 (Vol. 69, No. 10)
Permafrost Tunnel Shows Cross-sections of Past

A few miles north of Fairbanks stands what looks like a shack pushed back against a hill. Behind its front door dwells a distant past when saber-toothed tigers, mastodons and even camels roamed Alaska's Interior.

June 2000 (Vol. 69, No. 10)
GOP Chairmen Ask Gore to Recuse Himself From Roadless Plan

Vice President Al Gore should cease all participation in the Clinton administration's proposal to ban roads and other development in 43 million acres of roadless forests, two GOP committee chairmen say.

July 2000 (Vol. 69, No. 11)
Treasure Hunters Abound in Greece

Greed nearly starved Greece's legendary gold-transforming King Midas to death—but still they haven't learned.

July 2000 (Vol. 69, No. 11)
Hope Boy Finds Gem During Field Trip

It's not THE Hope Diamond, but a half-carat yellow gem worth up to $700 will fit that bill for an elementary school student from, where else, Hope.

July 2000 (Vol. 69, No. 11)
Deadly Explosion Ruled Accidental

A federal investigation shows that the explosion that killed a 42-year-old worker at the Trapper Mine near Craig in August 1999 was an accident.

July 2000 (Vol. 69, No. 11)
Canyon Resources Offers to Sell Mineral Rights

Canyon Resources Corporation recently offered to let environmental groups buy the mineral rights under nearly a million acres of land in western Montana.

July 2000 (Vol. 69, No. 11)
Four Miners Die in Mine Accidents in Ukraine

Four miners were killed in eastern Ukraine in two separate accidents during one week in May in the country's troubled mines, emergency officials said.

July 2000 (Vol. 69, No. 11)
15th, 16th Century Coins Found in Romania

A farmer in northwestern Romania has dug up nearly 2,000 Polish, Hungarian and Turkish silver and gold coins dating back as far as the 15th century, an official said.

July 2000 (Vol. 69, No. 11)
Mannequins Bring "Life" to Mining Museum

Mining is coming back to Leadville, at least in spirit.

July 2000 (Vol. 69, No. 11)
Millennium of Russian Gold on Display in U.S.

Russian treasures of gold and jewels, which survived centuries of upheaval and even the Bolshevik Revolution, will make their home in the United States for the next 10 months.

July 2000 (Vol. 69, No. 11)
Judge to Decide Regarding Release of Records

The state Department of Environmental Quality asked a judge to decide whether the agency can disclose documents about the financial condition of a mining company facing a fine.

July 2000 (Vol. 69, No. 11)
August Hearing Set for Crandon Mine

The fight over an agreement a northern Wisconsin town passed almost four years ago that endorsed a proposed underground zinc and copper mine near Crandon goes before a Dane County judge next month.

August 2000 (Vol. 69, No. 12)
Montana Approves Stillwater Expansion Bonds

The Montana Board of Investments unanimously approved a motion to issue up to $35 million in bonds to help Stillwater Mining Corp. expand its platinum and palladium mine.

August 2000 (Vol. 69, No. 12)
Groups Plan to Sue Over Lynx Protection

Three environmental groups have served formal notice that they intend to sue the U.S. Forest Service for failing to protect the Canada lynx as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.

August 2000 (Vol. 69, No. 12)
Rare Coin Makes a Mint at Auction

Imagine a coin worth more than its weight in gold...

September 2000 (Vol. 70, No. 1)
Mine Reopening Could Revive Region

Cominco American Inc., the U.S. subsidiary of Vancouver, British Columbia-based Cominco Ltd., is seeking regulatory approval to reopen the mine in early 2002.

September 2000 (Vol. 70, No. 1)
More Treasure From Sunken Ship

Gold chains, silver coins and bars of solid gold glittered in the tropical sun as the family of famed treasure hunter Mel Fisher showed off another significant find from a sunken Spanish galleon.

September 2000 (Vol. 70, No. 1)
V.P. Contender Addresses Mining Show

Republican vice presidential contender Dick Cheney, continuing a campaign swing through the West, said the Clinton administration has failed to step up and toe the mark for the mining and energy industry.

November 2000 (Vol. 70, No. 3)
World Gold Council Launches $3 Million Ad Campaign

The World Gold Council has launched a major Fall advertising campaign designed to capture the attention of American fashion and jewelry conscious women.

December 2000 (Vol. 70, No. 4)
A Changing Diamond Industry Looks to Canada for Growth

Robert Gannicott speaks in almost spiritual tones about the position his small Canadian diamond company holds and the forces—both natural and economic—that put it there.

December 2000 (Vol. 70, No. 4)
Industry Urges Restraint on Mining Reforms

Wyoming mining interests say the federal government doesn't need tougher environmental cleanup rules governing mineral extraction from public lands.

May 1999 (Vol. 68, No. 9)
Environmentalists Back FS on Mining Withdrawl

Representatives of every major environmental group in northern Arizona and nearly every American Indian tribe in the region lined up at a public hearing recently to praise officials from the Coconino National Forest.

May 1999 (Vol. 68, No. 9)
Huge Nugget To Be Auctioned

A 56-pound (25-kilogram) nugget belonging to an Australian prospector is 80 percent to 90 percent high-purity gold, University of Southern California scientists confirmed recently.

May 1999 (Vol. 68, No. 9)
As Millennium Nears, Copper No Longer King in Arizona

At the start of the 20th century, copper was king in Arizona, with one of every four workers employed in the mining trade. On the brink of a new millennium, however, the industry is no longer the cornerstone of the state's so-called "Five Cs" economy—copper, cattle, cotton, citrus and climate.

May 1999 (Vol. 68, No. 9)
GATA Launches Investigation into Gold Price Manipulation

Noted antitrusts and securities law firm specialist, Berger & Montague of Philadelphia, has been retained by the Gold Anti-Trust Action Committee (GATA) in order to assist in its investigation into the alleged manipulation of the gold market.

June 1999 (Vol. 68, No. 10)
N.Y. Congressman Introduces Utah Wilderness Bill

For the fifth time in the last decade, New York Congressman Maurice Hinchey has introduced legislation to set aside wilderness in Utah.

June 1999 (Vol. 68, No. 10)
Mining Claim Maintenance Fee Due

For miners holding a mining claim, mill site or tunnel site on public lands, August 31, 1999 is the last day to meet the annual filing requirement and pay the $100 maintenance fee to the Bureau of Land Management.

June 1999 (Vol. 68, No. 10)
Gold and Silver Deposit May Be World's Largest

A crater in an undersea volcano off Japan may contain the world's largest gold nugget ever found...

June 1999 (Vol. 68, No. 10)
Congressional Request to EPA: "Leave Our Kids Alone!"

"Grouping zinc with arsenic, mercury, cyanide and dioxins is not supported by science, logic or common sense." said George Vary, Executive Directors of the American Zinc Association (AZA).

June 1999 (Vol. 68, No. 10)
Gold Hunters Hit the Web in Fight with Missile Range

A group that hunted for gold for years on Victorio Peak on this restricted southern New Mexico test range has taken its legal battle against the Army to a website.

July 1999 (Vol. 68, No. 11)
Religious Broadcaster in Liberia Mining Venture

Religious broadcaster Pat Robertson, who lost up to $7 million in a failed diamond-mining venture in the former Zaire earlier this decade, is involved in a gold mine project in another African country.

July 1999 (Vol. 68, No. 11)
Kazak Government Collects Gold from Residents

The local administration in the Almaty region has issued an appeal for people to "lend" their gold to the government. Organizers are using the slogan: "Help us in difficult times."

July 1999 (Vol. 68, No. 11)
Recreational Gold Panning on the South Yuba River

The Forest Service recently announced a new area set aside for recreational gold panning on the South Yuba River, east of Nevada City.

July 1999 (Vol. 68, No. 11)
Groups Wonder Meaning of Call for More Wilderness

U.S. Forest Service Chief Michael Dombeck says there ought to be more wilderness—a comment that raised some concerns.

July 1999 (Vol. 68, No. 11)
Cutbacks at S. African Mines—Britain Blamed

South African gold miners are turning their anger towards Britain, charging that the sale of 25 tons of gold by the Bank of England has depressed gold prices and put them out of work.

August 1999 (Vol. 68, No. 12)
BLM Reports That 'Mining' Brings Most Public Reward

A report from the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) titled "Public Rewards from Public Lands—Fiscal 1998", shows that minerals production is the largest income producer for the federal government on BLM-managed lands.

August 1999 (Vol. 68, No. 12)
Long-Term Camping Plan at Fortymile Proposed by BLM

A draft environmental assessment of a proposal to allow long-term camping by gold miners along 21 miles of the North Fork of the Fortymile Wild and Scenic River is available from the Bureau of Land Management.

August 1999 (Vol. 68, No. 12)
"No Gold Sales" Says Nevada Senator

Senator Richard Bryan (D-NV) is assuring gold producers in Nevada and around the world that Congress will block the Clinton administration's attempt to sell off international gold reserves to help some debt-laden poor countries.

August 1999 (Vol. 68, No. 12)
Panel Cuts Park Monies, Eases Mining Restrictions

In twin blows to environmentalists, a Senate panel decided June 22nd to cut a high-profile proposal by President Clinton for buying park land and to limit an effort to restrict waste dumping at some hard-rock mines.

August 1999 (Vol. 68, No. 12)
State May Re-Examine Plans on Dredge Use Near Hope

The State Division of Governmental Coordination said it should have been asked to review the project a year ago to make sure the mine complies with the Alaska Coastal Zone Management Plan.

August 1999 (Vol. 68, No. 12)
Nevada Looks to Tourism to Fill Mining's Gap

Lt. Gov. Lorraine Hunt and the Nevada Commission on Tourism have agreed to seek an unspecified amount of marketing funds to boost tourism in the Ely, Nevada area in the wake of a mine closing.

August 1999 (Vol. 68, No. 12)
Miners Claim Victory in Fight That Began with Protest

Albanian miners in the rocky, pine-covered hills of northern Kosovo claim it wasn't just politics or religion or even ethnicity that started their war with the Serbs.

August 1999 (Vol. 68, No. 12)
Roads Protecting Grizzlies Reopen

U.S. Forest Service officials are drawing criticism from environmentalists for reopening some back-country roads that had been closed to protect threatened grizzly bears.

August 1999 (Vol. 68, No. 12)
Dollar Must Slip for Gold to Rise

Gold prices won't be on the rebound anytime soon, so World Gold Council Chairman John Willson is telling miners they have to eke by with the current depressed value of the metal.

August 1999 (Vol. 68, No. 12)
Feds Eye Restrictions on AZ Archaeological Sites

The Interior Department is proposing a moratorium on new mining and grazing in a 176-square-mile area of central Arizona dotted with American Indian ruins, a possible first step toward a new national monument.

September 1999 (Vol. 69, No. 1)
IMF Reconsidering Gold Sales to Finance Debt

The International Monetary Fund is reconsidering selling some of its gold reserves to help finance a Western debt-relief plan for some of the world's most debt-burdened countries, a top IMF official said.

September 1999 (Vol. 69, No. 1)
Governors Focus on Aid for Laid-off Miners

Keeping a health clinic in San Manuel operating was among key concerns the governor, state lawmakers and union officials addressed in a meeting about assisting laid-off copper miners.

September 1999 (Vol. 69, No. 1)
Nevada Counties, Towns Get Forest Service Grants

The Forest Service is issuing $69,630 in small grants to several rural communities in Nevada to help diversify their economies and wean them from dependency on natural resources.

September 1999 (Vol. 69, No. 1)
Labor Dept. Approves Aid to Laid-off Nevada Miners

The U.S. Labor Department approved special retraining and job-search assistance for more than 400 mine workers recently laid off at the BHP Copper Mine near Ely.

September 1999 (Vol. 69, No. 1)
ISEE Celebrates 25 Years

The society, started by nine founding members in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in 1974 as a non-profit professional organization, is dedicated to promoting the art and science of explosives engineering.

September 1999 (Vol. 69, No. 1)
Washington Miner Wins Poetry Contest

The National Mining Hall of Fame and Museum at Leadville has announced the results of a search earlier this year for new poetry about mines and mining.

September 1999 (Vol. 69, No. 1)
Carrizozo Lava Older Than Once Thought

The Valley of Fires lava flow outside Carrizozo is older than previously thought. In geologic terms, the central New Mexico volcanic feature is still a youngster at 5,000 years old. But that's considerably older than the 1,000-year-old tag scientists once placed on it...

October 1999 (Vol. 69, No. 2)
Montana Mining Association Raising Cash

The Montana Mining Association is trying to raise more than $150,000 to pay lawyers to continue the battle to overturn Initiative 137, the 1998 ballot issue that banned cyanide processing at most new or expanded gold mines.

October 1999 (Vol. 69, No. 2)
Mining Battle Case Under Advisement

Two weeks of sometimes-heated testimony have ended in a case that pits Cyprus Amax Minerals against opponents who want to prevent the company from mining ore from a central Colorado mountain.

October 1999 (Vol. 69, No. 2)
Sutro Tunnel a Big Draw

The population of Sutro almost reached the same number this weekend as it did during its short-lived heyday. About 600 visitors explored the site where Adolf Sutro envisioned a bustling city.

October 1999 (Vol. 69, No. 2)
Another Gold Heist Reported at Nome

Nome had its second gold heist in as many weeks October 1st and the victims of both thefts are offering a $10,000 reward for information...

November 1999 (Vol. 69, No. 3)
No Need to Rewrite Mining Regs, NAS Study Confirms

The findings substantiate what the Northwest Mining Association (NWMA) has been saying since Department of Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt first began an ill-conceived rule making over three years ago.

November 1999 (Vol. 69, No. 3)
Asarco Accepts Phelps Dodge Buyout

Asarco Inc. accepted a sweetened buyout offer from Phelps Dodge Corp., setting up a three-way, $2.9 billion deal that will make Phelps Dodge the world's largest copper producer.

November 1999 (Vol. 69, No. 3)
Once Lonely, Mojave Desert Phone Now World's Companion

Now, from all corners of the world, at all hours of the day and night, people call, trying to reach out and touch someone. Anyone, really, who might happen to be passing by when the Mojave Phone Booth starts ringing.

November 1999 (Vol. 69, No. 3)
Judge Blocks Road Protest

A federal judge has blocked a citizens' group from re-building a remote mountain road, a project that state and local officials feared might lead to violence.

November 1999 (Vol. 69, No. 3)
Company to Sue Over Stymied Gold Mine

A Colorado company that saw its plans for a big Montana gold mine derailed by a 1998 voter initiative says it will sue the state for hundreds of millions of dollars, to cover loss of the project.

November 1999 (Vol. 69, No. 3)
Surging Gold Prices Burn a Few Unlucky Mining Firms

The extraordinary rebound in gold prices is claiming some unlikely victims—a few of the gold mining companies themselves.

November 1999 (Vol. 69, No. 3)
Desert Phone Trashed

The once very lonely phone booth in the Mojave desert 75 miles southwest of Las Vegas, reported on in last month's ICMJ and media throughout the world, became a media darling...

December 1999 (Vol. 69, No. 4)
House Chair Requests Records on Forest Decision

House Resources Chairman Don Young is asking the White House and Agriculture Department for records related to President Clinton's decision to place 40 million acres of remote, federal forest land off-limits for development.

December 1999 (Vol. 69, No. 4)
BLM Wants to Withdraw South Pass Public Land

The Bureau of Land Management is proposing to close off nearly 5,000 acres of public land on South Pass for the next two years while a plan is developed for designating portions of Sweetwater River as wild and scenic.

December 1999 (Vol. 69, No. 4)
Silverton Preserving Lofty Symbol of Mining Era

Now, the Old Hundred-Mine boarding house has a new lease on life thanks to a town where some cling to the relics of a vanquished mining industry...

December 1999 (Vol. 69, No. 4)
Hijackers Make Off With 660 Pounds of Gold

Ten heavily armed men hijacked a plane November 5th, making off with 660 lbs of gold worth an estimated $2.3 million...

December 1999 (Vol. 69, No. 4)
Forest Service Boss Quits in Bull Trout Flap

The Forest Service supervisor in charge of national forests in Nevada abruptly announced her resignation November 8, citing an atmosphere of "hostility and distrust" toward federal employees in the state.

December 1999 (Vol. 69, No. 4)
European Gold Miners Seek Clarification Letter

Three European gold mining companies want the Bank of England to publicly state its activities in the gold and gold derivitatives markets. In a letter to the Financial Times, three small mining companies representing the majority of European gold production said since the start of the year, scores of reports about manipulation of the gold price had surfaced.

December 1999 (Vol. 69, No. 4)
Squeezing Diamond Into Graphite

A major diamond mystery has finally been cracked. For 40 years, scientists have tried but failed to apply so much pressure on the hard rocks that they would become something other than diamond. Now researchers reported that they succeeded.

December 1999 (Vol. 69, No. 4)