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The Magazine: April 2003 (Vol. 72, No. 8)
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April 2003 (Vol. 72, No. 8)

Table of Contents

The Bawl Mill
Freedom request denied
Missing sandwich becomes a federal case
Washington man takes the initiative
And I complained that the Journal was delivered late...
by Staff
Impact of Habitat Designations Grossly Underestimated
A UC Berkeley professor says the federal government is using an analysis method that seriously underestimates the economic impact of critical habitat designations for imperiled species.
by Associated Press
Legislative and Regulatory Update
• Alaska Governor blasts state habitat division
• Laws proposed and reviewed in Washington State
• Comments needed on California's arsenic goals
• New explosives requirements
• Bill introduced to curb ESA abuses
by Staff
Manslaughter Charges Dropped Against Sixteen to One Mine
Manslaughter charges against the Original Sixteen to One Mine, company president Mike Miller, and manager Jonathan Farrell, were dismissed by Judge Stanley Young Jr. in Downieville, California.
by Staff
A Unique Prospecting Method
In 1948, I lived alone in the Cerrillos Mountains south of Santa Fe, New Mexico, at the Tom Payne Mine. When lead and zinc metal prices suddenly took a nosedive, our ore and concentrate shipments from the Payne to the ASARCO smelter...
by Dr. Ralph E. Pray
Over the Divide
Ron Stockman
  1939—2003
by Staff
Cripple Creek, Colorado
The historic mining town of Cripple Creek (population 600) is 43 miles, by paved highway, west of Colorado Springs, almost two miles high in the Colorado Rockies.
by Edgar B. Heylmun, PhD
Picks & Pans: Virginia Prospecting
On a recent day in late November, the Virginia deer hunting season was in full swing. For most of the morning, while I was busy shoveling stream gravel into a sluice, the surrounding woods echoed with the sound of gunfire and...
by Mary E. Imwold
PLP Gets the Key!
I am an electrical contractor and a Board Member of Public Lands for the People (PLP). I have clients, a husband and wife, who own private property in the Los Padres National Forest. There are two ways to access their property. Both are pilots and able to fly in via small plane or helicopter, which for me was an exciting perk of working at this property.
by Walt Wegner
Mariposa, California
The sleepy town of Mariposa, known more today as one of the gateways to Yosemite National Park, was once considered the southern end of the famed “Mother Lode” gold deposits that stretched hundreds of miles throughout California’s Sierra...
by Frank Lorey III
The Ocampo District, Chihuahua
The village of Ocampo is wedged in a canyon about 178 miles, by Mexican Highway 16, west of the city of Chihuahua. It is a few miles west of Basaseachic Falls, and a few miles south of Highway 16, in high chaparral at an elevation of 6,500 feet. The completion of Highway 16 across the Sierra Madre Occidental greatly improved access to the region...
by Edgar B. Heylmun, PhD
The Collaboration
When Jimmy stuck his head in my office that morning, little did I realize that his question would lead to a surprising collaboration. “Hey, Slusher, did you know that the Rock Shop out east of Deming has a pile of our ore in their back yard?”
by Bob Schlosser
Mud Creek Placer Mine
Continued from last month...
The Mud Creek Placer Mine is a true quest. Previously we acknowledged the rich reserves contained in the ground near Candle, Alaska. Now the miners and equipment need to find their way there and start the operation.
by Randy McKinney
Mining Stock Quotes and Mineral & Metal Prices
by Staff
Looking Back
Excerpts from California Mining Journal, our original title, published 50 years ago this month.
by Staff
Melman on Gold & Silver
Never have I regretted the deadlines we must work with at this publication as I do this month, for events of tremendous significance are likely to occur between the time this column must be prepared and the time our readers will receive it.
by Leonard Melman

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