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The Magazine: October 2001 (Vol. 71, No. 2)
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October 2001 (Vol. 71, No. 2)

Table of Contents

The Bawl Mill
Normally this spot is reserved for a little humor or diatribe about government abuse. In light of recent events, I don’t think it’s appropriate for this issue. Following are a few personal comments.
by Scott Harn
Our Readers Say:
• Regarding 3809 and property rights
• Regarding the editorial, "A True Endangered Species" (09/01 ICMJ)
• We should all use the correct terms

by Staff
Legislative and Regulatory Update
• Utah's Kathleen Clarke nominated for top BLM post
• 3809 Regulations—Letter Drive
• Judge rules on Oregon coho salmon
• Norton joins fight against environmentalist lies...
by Staff
Placer & Lode Gold Deposits
Even though there are many varieties of gold deposits, prospectors often refer to two general types: placer and lode. Some lode examples include...
by W. Dan Hausel
Spanish Silver in Arizona
When Spaniards entered what is now Arizona, they encountered diggings made by Opata Indians. The Opata Indians, who now live and mine in the northeastern part of the state of Sonora, Mexico, were one of the few Indian tribes that was...
by Edgar B. Heylmun, PhD
Hog Mountain Mining, Past and Future
When you think of gold mining, you probably don’t consider Alabama to be the place to find your treasure. However, in the early 1800s, jobs were few, and the smell of gold drew men into the search. History records 13 districts in which mining was done at all stages—from pick and shovel, to an area like Hog Mountain.
by Eddie Lofton
Picks & Pans: Dredging Costa Rica
My interest in gold mining began with a few friends who, knowing that I was a chemist by trade (never mind that I am a biochemist), interrogated me every day at the gringo coffee shop in San Jose, Costa Rica.
by A.K. Williams
Gold in Texas
There are numerous legends involving “lost” Spanish mines and treasures in central Texas, some of which have actually been found. The most famous mine, which remains lost, is the San Saba.
by Edgar B. Heylmun, PhD
The Goldhill Mining District
Following the initial discovery of gold in North Carolina in 1799 on the Reed Plantation in Cabarrus County, gold was found in about 1842 in Rowan County at a locality that soon acquired the name Gold Hill.
by Sam E. Phifer, P.G.
New Arsenic Study Supports Tougher Standards
A National Academy of Sciences report shows that the Environmental Protection Agency greatly underestimated the cancer risks of arsenic in drinking water, according to EPA officials and other environmental experts familiar with the report.
by Associated Press
Miners Resume Search for Platinum Near Platinum
Goodnews Bay Platinum Mine, owned by Hanson Industries in Spokane, Washington, has resurrected a 60-year-old bucketline dredge to claw the steel-gray metal from the river drainages around Red Mountain on Cape Nushagak.
by Associated Press
Discoloring Assay Beads
We have developed a discoloring procedure, that makes parting unnecessary in many cases. Our discoloring solution contains sulfur, an element that tarnishes high silver content beads quite rapidly.
by Charles L. Butler
Tons of Gold Buried Under World Trade Center
Some 11.8 metric tons of gold worth an estimated $110 million, and 30.2 million ounces of silver valued at $121 million, are buried in the rubble below one of the collapsed buildings in the World Trade Center, The New York Times report
by Associated Press
Gold Rush Ship Uncovered in San Francisco
Workers at a hotel construction site uncovered a Gold Rush-era ship that had been buried for decades under the streets of the city’s Financial District.
by Associated Press
Mining Stock Quotes and Mineral & Metal Prices
by Staff
Melman on Gold & Silver
Deadlines are something we must live with at ICMJ as with any other publication, and as this columnist’s deadline approached early Tuesday morning of September 11, I turned on the financial channel to get some last pre-market commentary before completing this month’s column. What I saw was virtually beyond belief. A jetliner had just crashed into one of the two towers of the World Trade Center...
by Leonard Melman
The Financial Repercussions of the WTC Tragedy
If the goal of the September 11 terrorists was to inflict maximum damage on the American psyche as well as American economy, they could hardly have picked a better target than the twin towers of the World Trade Center (WTC).
by Leonard Melman
Permit Appears Likely for Rock Creek Mine
The final environmental review for a proposed mine beneath the Cabinet Mountains Wilderness appears, after 14 years, to favor allowing the hotly disputed mine to proceed.
by Associated Press

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