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The Magazine: January 2004 (Vol. 73, No. 5)
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January 2004 (Vol. 73, No. 5)

Table of Contents

The Bawl Mill
• Expensive bags will be around for a long time
• Year-end spending frenzy begins
• Illinois goes to the Democrats

by Scott Harn
From the Editor
There are several news items of interest here at ICMJ’s Prospecting and Mining Journal.
by Scott Harn
Our Readers Say
• "Roll-Front Uranium Deposits"
• "I'm glad your (web)site exists..."
by Staff
Forest Occupancy Decision Stands—US Forest Service Withdraws Appeal
In the July 2003 issue we reported on the case of Public Lands for the People (PLP) members Ron Lex and Ken Waggener (“PLP Members Win Occupancy Case—Appeals Continue”). The two miners were cited for occupying their...
by Staff
Legislative and Regulatory Update
• Small miners address Washington State Senators
• Recent IBLA decisions
• SEIS available for comment
• BLM to redo CBM study
• California forgets why it's known as "The Golden State"
by Staff
World Gold Council Launches New Gold Bullion Securities
Thanks to the efforts of the World Gold Council (WGC), investors in the yellow metal now have an excellent new way in which to participate in gold’s price movements.
by Leonard Melman
Epithermal Gold-Quartz Veins
The great mining geologist Waldemar Lindgren used the word “epithermal” to describe a type of quartz vein commonly found in desert regions of the United States and Mexico.
by Edgar B. Heylmun, PhD
Gold in Arkansas
Arkansas has an area of over 53,000 square miles, with a population of over 2.3 million. Natural vegetation consists of hardwood forests where not cleared for agriculture or urbanization.
by Edgar B. Heylmun, PhD
Picks & Pans: Winter Prospecting and "Forty Mile" Miller
It was in the mid-70s. I had just finished setting my traps out along the river when it dawned on me where “Forty Mile” Miller’s old hardrock outcrop was. Here I was, standing on snowshoes, floundering in three feet of snow, bracing myself so I wouldn’t...
by Ron Wendt
Company Eyes Reopening Mine Near Troy
Revett Silver Company, formerly Sterling Mining Company, hopes to reopen a dormant copper and silver mine near Troy, Montana, in the next six months because higher copper prices have made the operation practical, an executive said.
by Bob Anez
ICMJ's 13th Annual Photo Contest
Once again we'd like to thank the many participants in our annual photo contest.  Picking our favorite ten photos is never an easy task, as there were so many great photos from which to choose.
by Staff
Company Notes
• Newmont Mining Corp.
• Manhattan Minerals Corp.
• Phelps Dodge Corp.
• Gammon Lake Resources Inc.
• Glamis Gold Ltd.
• Quadra Mining Ltd.
• Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold Ltd.
by Staff
A Guide to Overlooked Gold Deposits—Part V (Conclusion)
This is the primary geological and mineral assessment agency in the US. Part of the Department of the Interior, the Geological Survey, often just called “The Survey” or USGS, has been in business since its founding in the 1800s. This means you can obtain publications all way the back to the early days of the survey...
by Lawrence Dee
The Golden Highway—Calaveras County
Heading north along Highway 49 into the central Mother Lode, the first old mining town in Calaveras County was Melones, located along the banks of the Stanislaus River. The town was named for the unique coarse gold flakes found in the gravels that resembled melon seeds, hence the name that came from the Mexican miners.
by Frank Lorey III
Mining Stock Quotes and Mineral & Metal Prices
by Staff
Melman on Gold & Silver
Last month saw a veritable mountain of good economic news come pouring out of government and industry. Industrial production was up; GDP rose strongly; unemployment rates came down; profits were up; consumer confidence readings rose; etc., etc., etc. And yet, strangely enough, the financial markets produced only a “molehill” of results.
by Leonard Melman

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